Cell Biology

Introduction

Cells are the basic building blocks of life, from simple unicellular organisms to complex plants and animals all life relies on the processes that occur in these units. By understanding cell structure and function we can only then begin to truly understand how organisms function as a whole.

The cells topic covers the basic organelles and their functions, differentiated and stem cells and looks at how new cells are created by organisms. We also begin to study how substances move in and out of cells and the field of microscopy and its role in developing our biological understanding of cellular functions.

At Thornaby Academy we teach the cells topic in three parts, these are:

  • Cells and Microscopy – you will learn the structure and functions of cells and their organelles. Microscopy involves learning how to prepare and view a tissue sample using a light microscope and learning how to calculate resolution and sizes.
  • DNA and Stem Cells – this section looks at what DNA is and its role in creating new cells. You will study the different types and application of cell division and how stem cells can be used.
  • Transport- this art of the syllabus studies how materials move into and out of cells and the importance of transport in life processes.

The Essentials

AnimalPlantBacteriaCells1

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gcse-aqa-biology-unit-2-6-638

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100% sheet cell Transport

100% sheet DNA and Stem Cells

100% Sheet Cells and Microscopy

100 % Practical MICROSCOPY

100 % Practical sheet Osmosis (1)

Deeper Understanding

Animal and plant cells Qs

Eukaryotic and Prokaryotic cells Qs

Specialisation in animal cells Qs

Specialisation in plants Qs

Diffusion Qs

Osmosis Qs

Active Transport Qs

Other Links

Cells-Knowledge-Organiser

Cells-Revision-Resources- Links

Review and Rate your Understanding

Have you learnt all the facts on the 100% sheet?

Have you completed the BBC Bitesize tutorial?

Have you been able to complete all the questions on the 100% sheet?

Let us know how you feel about cells in the comments section below. Any questions you have, just ask.

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